Rising Ocean Acidity Weakens Hunting Ability in Sharks

Sharks, the ocean’s top predators, renowned for their impressive hunting abilities, rely extensively on their keen sense of smell to hunt prey located miles away—earning themselves the label “swimming noses.” But a new study reveals that high levels of seawater acidity expected due to climate change can diminish their ability to track prey through sensing of odors.

The smooth dogfish, a shark whose range includes the Atlantic Ocean off the eastern United States, could lose their ability to sense the smell of food if climate change if ocean acidification continues its current pace.  Credit: Danielle Dixson/Georgia Tech

The smooth dogfish, a shark whose range includes the Atlantic Ocean off the eastern United States, could lose their ability to sense the smell of food due to ocean acidification if climate change continues at its current pace.
Credit: Danielle Dixson/Georgia Tech

Continue reading

Advertisements

We All Smell Odors Differently

The alluring smell of chestnuts roasting on an open fire, the sweet aroma of freshly baked cookies and cakes, and the refreshing fragrance of pine trees in the cold crisp air are all a pleasant reminder that the festive season is here. All of these aromas are sensed by our odor receptors in the nose and researchers at Duke University recently discovered that even a tiny change in those receptors can affect our sense and perception of smell.

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos

Continue reading